Hillary Clinton campaign strategist Mark Penn penned a memo declaring that since Barack Obama “is not at his center fundamentally American in his thinking and his values,” every Clinton “speech should contain the line that you were born in the middle of America to the middle class in the middle of the last century.” -Peter Beinart Go To Site

Democrat, Election, Character, Smears, Religion

On Monday, a "team member" named Laurence De Palma, who lists his location as East Nashville, presented volunteers with some talking points to convince Southern Christian voters they shouldn't vote for a Mormon. The message was available under "Resources" and tagged "persuasion." "I'm thinking that even though we don't LIKE campaigns to get nasty, we in the south (TN) come to EXPECT it," De Palma began. "What we also know is that we have a very 'rigid' view of Christianity, and apparently, Mormonism isn't anywhere in our views. This could easily win TN/SC/AL/GA, etc."

Immigration

Under U.S. federal law, beginning in 1940, all aliens have had to register. In 1965 a new law provided for phasing out by 1968 the immigration quota system based on national origins that had been in effect, with modifications, since 1921. U.S. immigration is now subject to a worldwide numerical ceiling and a system of preferences based on occupation and relationship to U.S. citizens.

Aliens who are admitted legally to the United States may be so certified and granted “green cards” that entitle them to rights that include employment. But they are still subject to limitations under local laws. The U.S. Supreme Court held, for example, that municipalities may require police officers to be U.S. citizens (1982); “Aliens are by definition those outside the community” of those under self-government.

Editorial, Liberal, Racism, Narrative

In recent months, the Obama Justice Department and Democrats on Capitol Hill have mounted a full-scale assault on state voter identification laws. Accusing Republicans of trying to return to the days of Jim Crow, Democrats allege that the laws, many of which require a photo ID for voting, discriminate against blacks and Hispanics. But an extensive new poll of Hispanic voters in the key electoral states of Florida, Colorado, and New Mexico shows strong support for those very photo ID laws.